The Spanish Inroads

The history of Alabama begins with the invasion of the country by the Spaniards under DeSoto in 1540, which was forty-three years subsequent to the discovery of the northern continent of America by John Cabot. Prior to the visit of DeSoto nothing is known of this region. Hernande DeSoto, a cavalier of Spain, athirst for the riches and renown which had crowned the valor and daring of Cortez and Pizarro, obtained the consent of Charles V. to his project for the subjugation of Florida. By this name was the continent of North America known to the Spaniards, and DeSoto doubted

The Great Indian War

The first engagement in the war with the Creeks (The name given the Muscogees by the traders because of the numerous streams within their territory, and applied by the whites generally) or Muscogees was on Burnt Corn creek, in the present county of Conecuh. Col. Caller, with 180 armed settlers from the vicinity of St. Stephens, attacked double that number of the enemy, who were returning from Pensacola with ammunition and supplies. Though surprised in their bivouac, the savages rallied and repulsed the whites, the mass of whom acted discreditably. Apprehensive of attacks on their exposed homes, the settlers abandoned

The First Territorial Organization

In 1798, the congress of the United States created into a Territory, called “Mississippi,” the region between 31° and 32° 28′ of north latitude, with the Mississippi river for the western and the Chattahoochee for the eastern boundary. Of this Territory President Adams appointed Winthrop Sargent of Massachusetts the governor. Gov. Sargent repaired to the seat of government, Natchez, on the Mississippi, and assumed authority. In May 1799, a detachment of federal troops relieved the Spanish garrison at Fort St. Stephens, which had been constructed by them twelve or thirteen years before. Below the junction of the Alabama and Tombikbee